This week in lifelogging: a day in the life of…

This week in lifelogging: a day in the life of...

A day in the life of a modern family member

When it comes to lifelogging, there is so much talk going on about fitness trackers, smart watches and all things that make the adult life more productive and efficient. Yet, lifelogging really is for all ages, shapes and sizes. From cradle to grave, all day every day, lifelogging could be a very useful habit to get into for the betterment of one’s life. Stereotypically, mothers could use the Jawbone UP wristband to track her health and happiness, fathers could use a little help from the OM Signal while he works out in the gym, while little darlings can put on the Mimo Baby Monitor for young parents to track their baby’s vital signs. For the elderly grandparent, Vesag could be an excellent way for their medicine reminders or to call for help in times of emergency. Lastly, not forgetting the family’s best friend, FitBark could be useful as a dog monitor and tracker. On a sunny day out, Sensblok also offers real-time monitoring of environmental data to help you make decisions that keeps every one safe and healthy. There’s simply something for every one on every occasion!

Read more: Wearable Technology For Every Member of the “Modern” Family and Becoming Cyborgs: 8 Gadgets That Augment Us and In the Details: Making a Smart Ring That Women Would Actually Want to Wear

Image credited to Teen Challenge Queensland

A day in the life of kids brought back to the past

 

With all these new gadgets for the entire family, a tinge of amazement has to go into how futuristic some of them actually look and become as time progresses. It is unimaginable ten years ago how wearable computers could even exist and can be as sleek as a pair of spectacles worn on one’s face. Yet, no matter how futuristic any of them look right now, these gadgets can one day become obsolete – useful only for making videos like the one you see above. In a bid to create some humour, entertainment and maybe even some sort of awakening, The Fine Bros have compiled a video of kids’ reactions to the once raved about Nintendo Game Boy. Indeed, technology becomes outdated if it doesn’t become better, quickly. Perhaps we will need more inspiration from Star Trek, which has been predicting the future since 1966.

SEE ALSO:  This week in lifelogging: awareness through wearable tech, Internet of things and memory matters

Video credited to The Fine Bros

A day in the life of a potato farmer

 

Now even though the children from the previous video seem to detest things of the past like the Game Boy, we are certain that they would thoroughly fancy this next thing that has existed for a long time now – potato crisps. The story of Walkers Crisps began in 1948, when butcher Henry Walker started making crisps in his Leicester Plant to keep his workers busy, as meat was scarce in post-war Britain. Many years have passed but the quality of Walkers Crisps persist, now made even better with the help of technology. Yet, besides adopting new technology to grow the potatoes used for Walkers Crisps, they have also made use of new technology (The Narrative Clip!!) to provide its loyal supporters with an insider look into the preparation and planting process at the potato farms. Now that you know where your Walkers Crisps come from, perhaps it seems like an even deeper connection has been forged between you and that next bag of crisps in the kitchen cabinet that you’re about to open. Enjoy!

Video credited to PepsiCoUK

A day in the life of a British Airways passenger

 

If all that talk about potato farms and British Walkers Crisps is calling out to you, and you have this unexplainable urge to visit England, how about booking a trip right now through British Airways? With an airlines that is constantly searching for ways to make customers feel happier each time they fly, you can be sure that your utmost welfare is taken care of throughout the entire flight. In their most recent move to fulfil this promise to their customers, they have launched The Happiness Blanket, a device that measures and monitors passengers’ happiness levels and then changes colour to reflect their mood. In this way, British Airways will know exactly if the bright lights in the aircraft is causing anxiety, or if the food is not making passengers feel at home. Cool initiative, isn’t it?

SEE ALSO:  This week in lifelogging: grandma was a lifelogger, forming habits and Neurocam introduction

Read more: 25 totally unnecessary but desirable travel gadgets

Video credited to British Airways

A day in the life of a Barcelonian

 

Or if you’re more of a Park Güell or Sagrada Familia person, then this video is probably going to interest you a lot more than potato farms or British Airways. After 363 hours of work and 817GB of data, filmmaker Rob Whitworth has created this amazing flow-motion video of Barcelona. Simply amazing! We hope you have a great weekend ahead that is nothing short of this amazing video!

Video credited to Rob Whitworth on Vimeo

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