This Week in Lifelogging: Designing QS Experiments, Untracking Yourself and The Misfit Shine

This Week in Lifelogging: Designing QS Experiments, Untracking Yourself and The Misfit Shine 3

Designing QS Experiments

Maybe you never had to design an experiment in school, or maybe, you don’t really remember how to go about it. This article is a detailed account of how anyone can design and implement their own QS experiments. “The best way to find out if the cause-effect relationship between X and Y exists for you is to conduct your own personal, Quantified-Self experiment.”

Read more: Quantified Self How-To: Designing Self-Experiements 

 Activity Tracking with Misfit Shine

Another activity tracking device has hit the market, The Shine. “Misfit Shine is an elegant, all-metal activity tracker that you can sync with your smartphone just by placing it on your phone screen. Find out how active you are every day, and set goals to become more active.” The device launched on the crowd-funding site indiegogo and is expected to be available in March, 2013.

Read more: Misfit Shine: an elegant, wireless activity tracker

What the consultancies think we should know about QS

The consultancies are getting into QS, a good indication that the masses will soon be embracing the movement. “The obsessions of today’s data geeks will become mainstream issues for the majority of people in tomorrow’s world.” Here’s an overview of quantified self from Ernest & Young.

Read more: Five things you need to know about the quantified self

Stressing about self-tracking

Does self-tracking stress you out? This blog post suggests that tracking certain aspects of life is unnecessary and that we should do things, like exercise and spending time with family, simply because we enjoy them. “That’s why we do things, not because we want numbers to get better. The numbers are meaningless, arbitrary, limiting, narrow, and without heart.” PersonalIy, I find measurement to be a motivating factor in a decision to do something, although not the factor; There’s something quite satisfying about seeing results laid out before you. What are your thoughts? Are the numbers meaningless?

SEE ALSO:  July 2013 round-up: This week in lifelogging

Read more: Untrack: Letting go of the stress of measuring